Apprenticeships, not internships, are the answer

Philip L. Elison questions the advice of Lou Glazer from Michigan future who says that unpaid internships are the answer to Michigan’s exodus of graduates.

Unlike paid jobs, internships provided by Michigan’s universities and colleges are generally unpaid, half-time positions, doing the work normally done by full-time professionals in the field. What career offices are touting as “hands-on experience” is what employers view as “free labor.” It is no surprise graduates then run for the paying jobs in other states. As the adage goes, “You get what you pay for.”

And he suggests a solution: do what the US law says.

Instead of internships, businesses and organizations should be creating apprenticeships. In the skilled trade sectors, an apprentice begins to work for a skilled mentor that provides advice, guidance and counsel. While working and being paid, the college apprentice gets on-the-job training, makes connections in the field and accumulates hands-on experience.

It’s so obvious you wonder why Michigan Future haven’t thought of it themselves.

Update (July 15): The president of the Detroit Regional Chamber offers a defense of the program: the program will focus on paid and rewarding interships – 25,000 of them. It would be nice to hear from those interns once the program starts.

2 Responses to Apprenticeships, not internships, are the answer

  1. Katrin says:

    It’s something I never get. In Germany (where I am) everybody doing an apprenticeship in a company (part time work, part time school), gets paid and that right out of highschool, but students who have already some knowledge intern for free and it’s considered normal.

  2. exintern says:

    You are right: there’s a social acceptance of the phenomenon despite its illegality and unfairness. It speaks of the vulnerability of the youth. We cover the German angle of unfair internships in the past.

    https://unfairinternships.wordpress.com/2008/03/31/germany-real-work-for-no-money/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: